The Colors of Copenhagen – Friday’s Weekly Travel Photo


As I round out my first year in Copenhagen I can now look back over my time here and reflect on each of the seasons.  The blustery rainstorms and beautiful days of late summer. The gorgeous golden hues of fall.  The stark but enchanting white dusting of snow on frozen lakes in winter.  However, one of my favorite times is late spring and early summer.  The days are finally growing longer, the weather is starting to get warmer, life is everywhere and the flowers are in bloom.

The photo above was taken in the heart of Copenhagen in the city park that surrounds and is connected to the Copenhagen Botanical Gardens.  It embodies the wonderful vibrancy of this city. A city which has a number of canals, a wealth of beautiful parks, and is awash in a surprising amount of color. In addition to Copenhagen’s wonderful parks, most of the buildings have small courtyards in their center.  As I sit here writing this the cherry trees in the middle of mine are in bloom.  Combine these wonderful natural colors with the multi-hued paint used to decorate many of the city’s buildings and you get a surprisingly vibrant and visually appealing city.  Not at all what you might expect from a northern city which spends half the year in quasi-darkness.

Would you like to see previous Friday Photos? View past travel pictures here.

Friday’s Weekly Travel Photo – Preikestolen Norway

Over the Edge - Preikestolen

Today’s Friday Photo comes from Preikestolen, Norway also known as the Preacher’s Pulpit.   This incredible rock formation overlooks the Lysefjorden and consists of a rock outcropping which is about 82 feet by 82 feet and projects out into empty space over the fjord.  As you can see from today’s photo the view down is pretty stunning.  What you’re looking at is about 1,982 feet of fresh Norwegian air between the ledge, my boots and the fjord below.  Due to the nearly square nature of the pulpit and the sturdy nature of the rock which forms it, most visitors pause to look over the edge before dangling their toes out into empty space.  As someone who isn’t a huge fan of heights it definitely pushed my comfort zone but was a wonderful experience, and one that helped me partially overcome my fear of heights. There are no guide rails, ropes, or other safety devices in place.

To reach Preikestolen there’s a semi-rugged 3.8km hike which climbs about 1,000 feet. However, the path tends to rise and fall several times as you hike along ridges and past a number of small lakes.  While parts of the path are very easy and well maintained others tend to be pretty steep and be made largely of small boulders.  If you find yourself in Norway, I highly suggest making the trip.  The closest major city is Stavanger, located in the South West of Norway.

Remember you can see Friday Photos from previous weeks here.

This post was made possible in part due to the support of ESTA Permits, offering their visum USA service.