A Visual Tour of Iceland’s Westfjords

Is a four day solo road trip through Iceland enough to properly explore the country?

Absolutely not.

Is it, however, enough time to run up into the largely deserted Westernfjords, roam brilliant empty fjords, see puffins, and then hop a ferry down to Snaefellsnes for a taste of more waterfalls, extinct volcanos and gorgeous Icelandic horses?

Absolutely.

I’ll talk a bit in a future post about just how powerful, liberating, and wonderful a solo road trip like this is. But, for now, I want to take you through a visual tour (in color) of my road trip through Iceland’s Westfjords. According to one statistic I read before the trip, fewer than 11% of visitors to Iceland visit the region in the far Northwest and in this instance, that lack of tourism is great news for people eager to explore a vibrant but more natural and less touristic Iceland.

Snow Covered Cappadocia – Weekly Travel Photo

Rock Formations in Cappadocia

In February of last year I found myself in the heart of one of Turkey’s worst cold spells in 25 years.  The bad news was that it was absolutely freezing (lows bottomed out at -21 C) but the upside was I had the chance to see the Cappadocia region covered in a layer of snow.  The stone spires that the area is famous for really looked magical as they stood against a partly cloudy but no less vivid blue sky.

Cappadocia is best known for its rock formations, underground cities and wines.  The soft but still solid nature of the stone has allowed people to build entire cities into, and beneath the area’s hills.  It is an incredible region and unlike anything I’ve encountered elsewhere in the world.  This photo was taken about 10 minutes drive outside of Goreme on the way to the Open Air Museum.

Would you like to see previous Friday Photos? View past travel pictures here. This photo was taken on a Canon T3i (600D) Camera using a Canon IS 55-250mm lens.