Reflecting on Ignite Phoenix

I had the pleasure of sharing the stage this past Tuesday with 16 incredible presenters.  Together, we all overcame our fear of the stage, of the spotlight and of failure to ascend one of the valley’s largest soap boxes for 300 seconds.  During the course of our 5 minute presentations we battled our nerves, time and the intense desire to ramble in order to share our passion with some 600+ attendees.

Truly, the Ignite Phoenix experience is a rare and incredible opportunity.  It is a synergy of random ideas and passions.  An assemblage that transcends genre in a way that has become rare and difficult to find. Ignite 5 saw presentations on Bats, Education, Gundam Action figures and Dance to name but a few – short of random links posted by particularly eclectic friends on Twitter, or social link aggregators like Digg/Reddit there are only a few events like Ignite Phoenix and TED/TEDxPhoenix which truly embrace random intellectualism and curiosity.

The thing about Ignite that really makes it that much more special is the pace. 20 slides, 5 minutes, 15 seconds a slide…what a rush! It’s a format that gives even the most experienced public speaker pause.  All the while it creates a platform which is incredibly audience friendly.  With the standard format typically consisting of 18 presentations, tuning out for 5 minutes if you don’t care for a topic or find it interesting is painless. It’s the exact opposite of the 90 minute lectures droning on about something that failed to catch our interest which many of us came to dread in College, Business courses and seminars.

A Presenter’s Reflections

Presenting at Ignite Phoenix pushed my comfort level and boundaries.  I’ve presented in the past to smaller groups, traveled the world for months on my own, delivered business pitches and successfully navigated social situations – but this was different. This was terrifying. It took me back to a time before I’d developed my current social competency.  It took me back to the first day of High School every year when the fear and anxiety of the High School social experience/social shark tank left me physically sick to my stomach. Heart racing, palms sweating, imagination running wild.

Applying to present was a challenge in and of itself.  I found 15 excuses every time I went to fill out the application. Was my idea good enough?  Was I truly passionate about it?  Would people care?  Why would I want to do it – after all, no one was forcing me to apply.  Eventually, I put aside my excuses, nervously re-read the my brief topic submission and hit submit. That action came with the same sensation I typically feel when making a big purchase online. Do I really want this? Did I order the right item?

So, in light of all that – why did I do it? Because it was worth every piece of energy I invested – both positive and negative.

Overcoming those challenges, those discomforts and those excuses was an incredible learning experience.  Sure, Ignite is about sharing your passion and knowledge with others but it’s also about something more.  For the presenters it’s about learning about yourself.  About building and internalizing your self confidence and belief in your self – and that alone is invaluable.  Making the decision to present was worth it long before I even took the stage and actually presented.  That was the icing on the cake – A lucky bonus and exciting opportunity to share.

What of the presentation itself?

There’s something special about the Ignite crowd. They’re happy.  That sounds silly, but in this day and age it’s significant.  They’re not there because they have to be, they’re not there because they should be, they’re there to learn and because they want to be! That’s over 600 open, supportive, eager eyes, ears and minds that want the presenters to succeed.  They want to learn, be inspired and captivated. That positive energy is a force to be reckoned with.  It is contagious and it makes presenting much, much easier. There is no competition, no back stabbing or anything of the sort. It’s just open, sincere cooperation, collaboration and sharing. That positive approach stretches beyond the crowd and was shared by the other presenters. There were words of advice, suggestions, encouragement, jokes, smiles, fist bumps, high fives and shoulder pats throughout the course of the evening.

Tips for future Presenters

I really hope this post helps encourage each and every one of you to submit a proposal to present at Ignite Phoenix 6. If you get selected, here’s my advice:

Go simple. Go big. – Your slides are the life of your presentation and an indication of how professional it looks and feels. Listen to the organizers and past presenters. Go with big, simple images and very simple statements or text. One lone word is best, 3 or 4 is good, more than that? Try and avoid it. There’s a temptation to feel like you need to read what’s on your slides. Even if it’s only a sentence to “remind” you. Don’t do it! Anything more than one word encourages you to awkwardly change from a conversational delivery to a quickly read interjection. This breaks your flow, changes topics abruptly and can be awkward. If you put more than two words on a slide IGNORE THEM – they’re for the viewers, not you as presenter.

Rehearse – Yeah, yeah. I know it’s a pain, but look at it this way. Your presentation is only 5 minutes. Running through it two or three times a day before you present is no big deal. Your presentation should change EACH time you present it. Why? Because you need to focus on the main points you want to share and get comfortable with your time frame – NOT with a memorized statement you’re going to regurgitate. Think about what you like in each practice run, then work on incorporating it next time. That way, no matter what happens during your presentation you can adapt and respond without getting stumped!

Warm Up! – Don’t present cold! For Ignite Phoenix 5 we began at 6PM. I practiced the night before, which was great – but you also need to practice as close to your actual presentation as you can. For me, that meant going through my presentation twice at 4PM before heading to the event. A cold start makes it MUCH more difficult to remember what you want to cover and leaves you less comfortable with the timing, slides etc. – it means you have to think more…and that’s the last thing you want to be doing.

Don’t Narrate – It wastes time! Pausing your presentation to say, “woah, here we go”, “whoops, that went fast”, or “umm….where was I” will throw off your rhythm, undermine your confidence, and tells people there’s a problem. Silence is golden and less expensive! You’ve only got 15 seconds a slide and 300 seconds total – don’t waste them!

Have an Intro Slide! – The Ignite Phoenix team will introduce you with an intro slide, but have one of your own! It helps make the presentation your own AND it gives you valuable time to get out there, look at the audience, get comfortable with them, and let your brain catch up before you’re performing at full presentation speed!

Above all, get out there and try it. Ignite Phoenix 6 applications are already open. It truly, truly is an incredible experience. One that everyone is capable and qualified to participate in. Go SUBMIT your idea now!

Want to learn more about Ignite Phoenix? Check out http://www.ignite-phoenix.org.

Lastly, thank you again to everyone involved in the Ignite Phoenix process. Those who made it possible, those who presented and the wonderful audience.

January 20th 2009 – Today Was A Good Day

Today is January 20th, 2009 and it was a good day.  It was one of those days that stands out in your memory as history marches forward.  As the paintbrush of time colors in the tapestry of life, what once struck us as broad strokes of the brush fade into subtle outlines. I have no doubts that this day – these memories – will survive the test of time.  As I reflect upon this day in history I know that these past 24 hours will forever stand as a cornerstone in the annals of American history.  Further, though it is perhaps far less significant to the world at large, today has held incredible significance for me personally and not just because of the presidential inauguration of Barack H. Obama.

Leann Rimes – The Star Spangled Banner

Like many Americans today was special for me.  It was the first time in my life that the candidate I had chosen, researched, fought for and supported was elected as President of the United States.   It is an amazing affirmation of a political system that, despite its problems, is one of the world’s modern marvels.  Today, the majority will of over 300 million US citizens was carried out in a peaceful transition of power between two camps of astoundingly different ideologies and principles…All framed by the backdrop of one of the worlds most powerful military and economic powers.   What an amazing thing.

The Necessity

I believe that this transition – this wide stroke of the brush – marks the true beginning of the 21st century.  For the last 8 years we have been in flux.  As a nation we have been lost, forced to adjust. We have been trudging forward while adhering to outdated philosophies and principles. While other parts of the world began to embrace the 21st century the United States stood confused and unsure of its own identity.  The cost has been a devastating economic collapse, a widespread assault on intellectualism and major adjustments across the global political landscape.

I realize that President Obama and his team will not accomplish all that is expected of them.  I also realize that the true depths of his moral fiber and vision are untested. Yet I refuse to give up on the belief that he holds the potential to truly be the man we believe him to be. His track record suggests that he harbors the inner potential to truly lead the United States into the 21st century and his platform offers a framework to help America take those steps.

President Obama’s speech today was not flashy. It did not provide great quotes to be regurgitated across the annals of time – but it wasn’t meant to. Today’s speech spoke to the intellectuals among the American people and the world at large.  It was a speech that said, “I am here now and I will do everything within my power to do what is necessary.”  It was the speech of a humble man with noble character reaching out to his fellows with sleeves rolled up, back bent with the weight of a world that can be.  It was a speech that spoke to those of us who have been laboring furiously to keep America strong, to keep America true and to keep America supreme.  For me it was a dream come true. It was a speech that re-committed America to true Science. It was a speech that re-committed America to protecting the world that sustains us. It was a speech that re-committed America to the constitution and our roots. It was a speech that re-committed America to education, peace, and prosperity. Equally as significant, it condemned the actions over the past 8 years that pulled us towards catastrophe.   Above all, it was a speech that committed America to change – no matter how difficult that change may be – and  embraced the needs and dynamics of the 21st century.

Race

Perhaps it’s my perception of the world as a Millennial. Perhaps it’s the result of my travel or upbringing.  I find myself in an odd conundrum. While today marks an incredible moment in American history and has turned the tide of hundreds of years of blood, tears and agony, I find myself somewhat detached. I’ve never seen a segregated world. I’ve never lived in an America powered by slavery.  Born in 1985, the world I know and have seen is one of hope and opportunity.

I have no illusions as to the presence of stereotypes within myself but I revel in the fact that those are just that…idle stereotypes easily displaced and overcome.  My world is one that offers but a glance to race while focusing its scrutiny on the individual regardless of their sex or ethnicity.  As the world and America celebrate an historic moment that rightfully has profound meaning to those who at one time attended segregated schools and faced the most insidious forms of hatred, I find myself looking forward.  I pause today in profound gratitude to all those who have made this day possible, but equally it’s significance is somewhat reduced for me. For me this is not about the election of America’s first Black President, but rather about what I hope will be one of America’s greatest Presidents.

My Brother

As I sat watching President Obama sworn into office my younger brother, an individual who I am incredibly close to, was somewhere in the skies over Europe.  At the age of 21 he has undertaken an adventure that leaves me awed.  He left the U.S. on the evening of the 19th and began the long trip across the Atlantic to London before continuing down toward Italy where he will begin an internship with the US Consulate. The connection between a new president and my brother’s impending period of service truly strengthened my investment and pride in the all that the US is and has to offer. The resulting feeling isn’t something words will convey – all I can say is that the feeling was powerful, unique, and complex. Today marks the start of a major phase of growth in his life and no doubt, through all that he will share, my own.

Food, Reflections & Capitalism

At 5:00PM I left my office in Scottsdale where I work as a Mergers and Acquisitions Analyst. I paused briefly at the market to pick up groceries and then again to purchase a cigar. By 5:30 I was home and after a brief pause set to cooking a special celebratory, albeit experimental, dinner.

Sleeves rolled up I set to it – angel hair rice noodles, two beautiful portabello mushrooms, 1 package of enoki mushrooms, half a yellow onion, 1 pound of peeled fresh shrimp, 6 saved shrimp heads, 4 chopped and diced cloves of garlic, half a lemon, a hearty mix of spices, salt, pepper, olive oil, butter and 1/3 of a bottle of canola oil. Soon I had a bubbling frying pan full of noodles and delicious smelling food. Somehow, some way, the meal turned out perfectly and resulted in an incredible, steaming plate of a pasta/seafood delight.

After dinner and ready to relax I picked up the CAO Criollo Cigar I’d purchased earlier, poured a sipping glass of Effen Black Cherry Vodka on the rocks and made my way outside into Scottsdale’s beautiful, partly cloudy, 75 degree evening.  The CAO Criollo was perfect: mild and slow burning with just the right hint of taste.  As I sat on the steps of my apartment complex I reflected on the day, the year and all that had transpired.  As I sat there watching the stars slowly brighten across the sky I considered my various entrepreneurial projects and decided to finish the evening out with the addition of a new one – the attempted sale of several domain names I purchased back in August.

Truly I live a blessed life.  One lived in the greatest country in the world.  Today was a good day.