Tallying Up The Cost: 21 Days In Argentina

El Calafate Airport - Patagonia, Argentina

What does a breakneck, budget conscious, adventure trip through Argentina cost? Here’s the financial break down from my recently completed 21 day trip.  These figures cover all of my direct trip expenses (they don’t include equipment I already had such as shoes and a backpack). Travel period: December 15th – January 4th.

This trip visited Buenos Aires (3 times), Ushuaia in Tierra del Fuego, El Calafate/El Chalten in Patagonia and Iguazu in Misiones.

Argentina is commonly hailed as an extremely cheap destination.  While I’d agree that by western standards it is a relatively cheap destination it is not, by Latin American standards, cheap.  At best I’d flag it as moderately priced.  As I understand it the nation has seen massive inflation in the last half-decade, particularly in its tourism infrastructure.  An infrastructure which operates as part of their greater transportation infrastructure, but with deep discounts for locals and natives.

The size of the country also contributes significantly to the cost of exploring it in depth.  While Argentina has a train infrastructure, it is limited and tourists are widely encouraged to avoid it.  Similarly, the country has a decent air infrastructure, but it is only serviced by 3 major airlines. Of which the government influenced Aerolineas is the primary provider.  The other significant provider is LAN Airlines.  Unfortunately, there are no ultra-budget airline providers as can be found in Europe and parts of the US which make flights fairly expensive. On the upside, Aerolineas offers a tourist pass which allows you to buy discount credits.  While not vastly cheaper, for anyone flying the minimum of 3 legs it is a viable option.

Lastly it is important to note that Bus travel is the primary method for long distance travel in Argentina. While relatively slow compared to high speed rail or air travel the long distance bus system in Argentina was surprisingly pleasant albeit somewhat expensive.  Even my 18 hour bus ride from Buenos Aires to Iguazu was a relative pleasure with the level of service and comfort well above what I’ve grown used to while flying.  For a little bit more (~420 vs ~360 Pesos) I opted for the S/Cama or near-bed service which allowed me a full night’s sleep (almost unheard of when I fly/do trains).  On the BA -> Iguazu leg they served complimentary Scotch, beer and wine in addition to two meals and a beverage service.  The bus also boasted several TV screens which played American movies with Spanish subtitles.  For those visiting and on a budget, don’t rule them out if you’ve got the time to travel a little slower. Make sure to read through Wikipedia’s writeup on Transport in Argentina.

The Raw Figures

ATM (Cash) – $1,680.40

Bank Fees – $27

Credit Cards – $256.99

Airfare – $1,968.71

Total: $3,933.10

Argentina is a Credit Card phobic country.  That means that $1.25 stick of bubble gum you’d normally purchase with your Credit Card in the States is going to have to be a cash purchase.  Most larger purchases (over $10 USD) can be put on a Credit Card though it is surprisingly hit or miss.  This in large part accounts for the $27 in added bank fees I had to pay.  Though that figure is misleading as that’s only the fees charged by my domestic bank.  Each transaction also had an added 16 Peso ($4) fee charged by the Argentinian bank and my domestic bank adds a 3% currency “exchange” fee. Ouch.  Especially since my Capital One Credit Card doesn’t have any international use penalties.

Note that a full half of my trip expense was for Airfare.  Of the actual on-trip expenses, the Cash/Credit Card fees include several major purchases. These include $200 for the Big Ice Glacier Trek in El Calafate, Approximately $150 combined in Ushuaia for Penguin and Tierra del Fuego National Park tours, $80 for an amazing Tango show at Cafe de los Angelitos in BA, an extra $50 in accommodation over hostel prices during Christmas in El Chalten  and $200 for round trip Bus travel from Buenos Aires to Iguazu.

Concerning airfare: I took a total of four flights. They were a mixture of round trip, one-way and progressive tickets.  They were as follows:

-Phoenix to Los Angeles Return

-Los Angeles to Buenos Aires Return

-Buenos Aires to Ushuaia / El Calafate to Buenos Aires

-Ushuaia to El Calafate One Way

In general the remainder of my expenses went to food, drink, entertainment, accommodation and minor transport.  All accommodation was hostel based and with 1 exception ranged between $10-$20 USD.

In Buenos Aires only use “Radio Taxis” and don’t set a custom price unless you’re doing a long haul trip and know what is reasonable.  In general, relying on the meters was a much more cost effective option.  Of the 3 times I negotiated my own fare I came to realize later that I’d paid almost double what it would have cost otherwise.

Hopefully this helps you plan your adventure to Argentina.  Questions or areas you’d like more in-depth information about?  Please feel free to leave a comment and I’ll be happy to answer what I can.

For those who are regular readers, you may note that this was the most expensive trip I’ve taken so far.  This was in large part due to the egregious airfare costs associated with the trip and fast rate of travel.  Faster = more expensive every time.

Safe travels, open roads!