Most Beautiful Country – Ask Alex – Travel Question Wednesdays

Ask Alex - Travel Question Q and A every Wednesday

This post is part of the Ask Alex, Travel Question Wednesdays weekly series. To see previous questions click here. To submit your own; tweet it to @AlexBerger, ask it in a comment on this post or send it in by e-mail.

This week’s travel question is from Sam who asks,

Q. “What is the most beautiful country (overall) you’ve been to?

A. – Oh boy, this question always gives me a heck of a hard time. I’m going to assume that you’re talking natural beauty and not about the native population? So far I’ve spent time in some capacity in 38 countries (this excludes Asia and Africa which are on my to-see list). Some of those visits have been little more than brief glimpses while others have been more in-depth and immersive. I feel as though I’ve still missed a lot, even in the countries I’ve visited multiple times and spent extended periods of time in. So, I encourage you to take these answers with a grain of salt. I also can’t give just one, so I’m going to give you my top three.

Hiking Perito Moreno Glacier - Patagonia, Argentina

1. Argentina

In 21 days in the country I was exposed to two of the country’s three incredible climates. These were the cold, mountainous and rugged southern regions of Tierra del Fuego and Patagonia in the south and the hot, lush, jungle regions to the north around Iguazu Falls. Due to the country’s massive size, proximity to the Andes and Antarctica it has a lot to offer. While you hear a lot about Argentina’s rich tango culture and incredible meat, its real gem is its natural landscapes. I think it’s one of the most overlooked countries out there for natural beauty and also, thus far, ranks as the all around most beautiful country I’ve visited.

A Dog Resting Atop Sharkstooth

2. The United States

As an American, I find my home country often gets overlooked – perhaps because a lot of English-centric travel bloggers are original from or based out of the US. The truth of it is though that as with Argentina, the United States is amazing and offers some of the most incredible landscapes and environments you’ll find in the world. The rivers and streams of the Colorado Rockies and San Juans are some of my favorite countryside in world. Places like the Grand Canyon, Sonoran Desert, White Sands, Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Florida Everglades are beautiful, captivating locales that everyone should aspire to see in their lifetime.

Highlands_Scotland_Lake

3. Scotland

During my first visit to Scotland I developed a crush on the country. After my 2nd I fell in love with it completely. There’s something enchanting about the collision between history and natural beauty. While the central highlands and Isle of Skye are beautiful, and areas I highly recommend to everyone, I also strongly suggest the north western coastline and the Orkney Islands. Both are regions that I find myself with an insatiable hunger for.

There are so many amazing places out there, it really is hard to pick a favorite.  I invite you all to share your own favorite destinations.  Which 1 (or 3) have you fallen in love with?

Have a question of your own? ASK IT! Want to see previous questions? click here.

Why Denmark – Ask Alex – Travel Question Wednesdays

Ask Alex - Travel Question Q and A every Wednesday

This post is part of the Ask Alex, Travel Question Wednesdays weekly series. To see previous questions click here. To submit your own; tweet it to @AlexBerger, ask it in a comment on this post or send it in by e-mail.

This week’s travel question is from Lindsay who asks,

Q. “Alex, why visit Denmark over England, France, Germany? Make your case.

A. – That’s a difficult one!  Over the last 10 months I’ve fallen in love thoroughly with Copenhagen, and the parts of Denmark I’ve seen.  However, it’s a relatively small country and geographically fairly uniform.   You won’t find the awe inspiring fjords, clifftop castles, or the soaring spires of the alps. What you will find are beautiful cities awash in vibrant colors which are populated by wonderful, friendly, happy and sincere people.  As most of my time spent here in Denmark has been in the late fall/winter I’ve stayed on the island of Zealand where the capital city, Copenhagen is located.  It will not be until later this spring that I have the opportunity to head to the mainland (Jutland) and the country’s many smaller islands to explore Denmark more completely.

The Danes have a rich history and heritage.  Their flag is the oldest flag in the world.  They were the launching point for the Viking explorers, raiders and conquerors that explored the globe and left a lasting mark everywhere they visited.  More recently they have invested heavily in alternative technologies, education and culture.  All of these elements come together to create a landscape that is distinctly Danish.  Danish artists, architects, musicians, and intellectuals have been incredibly influential on the international stage for hundreds of years – an incredible accomplishment given Denmark’s small population and challenging geography.  Each of these factors shapes and crafts the Danish experience and what you will find when you visit the country.

That said, I would not necessarily call Denmark an exclusive destination country.  It is possible to visit England, France or Germany as the sole destination for a 2+ week trip and leave feeling like you still missed a lot.  With Denmark I think you would find it to be a wonderful, rich, experience but one which might lack the diversity and fast-paced stimulation that you typically want out of a 2-3 week trip.  I believe a good illustration of why this is the case is Copenhagen.  As I mentioned earlier, I’ve fallen in love with the city.  It is beautiful, it is charming, it feels cozy, and it has a lot to offer.  However, it’s what I would call a 4 day or 8 week city. The primary tourist attractions in Copenhagen – Nyhavn, the Opera House, Tivoli, the Little Mermaid, Christiania, etc. – can be seen fairly easily over the course of 2-3 days.  A week or a week and a half would be far too long for a casual visit. However, for those who have several weeks to spend and who want to immerse themselves in Copenhagen, the city has a lot to offer.  Copenhagen has an amazing music scene, wonderful festivals, an incredible outdoor, park and BBQ lifestyle in the summer, charming coffee shops and a wealth of small stores and quirky side streets that draw you in and leave you hankering for more.  In summer it is a wonderful cafe city with its ancient cobblestone streets, a young, gorgeous population, vibrantly painted multi-colored buildings, bikes everywhere, and a wealth of outdoor cafes.  The city’s numerous canals and lakes also give it an Amsterdam-like feel, but in a uniquely Danish fashion.

So, to answer your question – I would suggest Denmark, but I would suggest it as part of a larger visit.  Round trip flights to Copenhagen from Berlin, Germany can often be found for less than $70 USD.   Flights from England and France are often only slightly more expensive making it hard to justify not including Copenhagen in an itinerary.

Would you like me to elaborate on an aspect of this response?  Let me know!

Have a question of your own? ASK IT! Want to see previous questions? click here.

Credit Card Points and Frugal Travel – Ask Alex – Travel Question Wednesdays

Ask Alex - Travel Question Q and A every Wednesday

This post is part of the Ask Alex, Travel Question Wednesdays weekly series. To see previous questions click here.  To submit your own; tweet it to @AlexBerger, ask it in a comment on this post or send it in by e-mail.

A quick introductory note – When I began authoring VirtualWayfarer in July of 2007 I never expected that I’d still be blogging on travel, adventures, study abroad and everything that goes with it nearly five years later.  Over the years I’ve had a lot of questions and luckily my friends, network, and more than a few random strangers have gone well out of their way to answer those questions. While I still find myself asking questions on a regular basis I’ve found that I can also pay it forward as a resource for friends, my readers, and strangers alike.  In an effort to share what I’ve learned from my various adventures I’m launching a new Wednesday feature here on VirtualWayfarer.  Starting today I’ll be answering one reader-submitted question every week.  Anyone can submit, and all past questions will be archived and available as a resource for readers of this blog. I’m going to take a very open approach to the topics I’ll cover, so feel free to ask me just about anything  – as long as it is travel related.

This week’s travel question is from Lindsay B. she asks,

Q. “What’s the best way to use credit card points/miles to travel frugally? Recommend any cards/programs/strategies?”

A. This is a challenging one because it depends on a wide variety of different factors which vary from person to person, and are constantly changing. I’ve had a very mixed track record in the past, having gone so far as to swear off mileage plans after a particularly frustrating experience, before being lured back by Chase’s 100,000 mile British Airways signing bonus.

Let’s start with the basics.  Before you even consider getting a mileage/points card, you have to evaluate your spending and debt behavior.  Is getting a credit card something that  makes economic sense for you?  Can and will you pay it off completely each and every month? Keep in mind that if you carry a balance and are paying interest that’s airfare money going up in smoke.  You’re also going to need to tally up your monthly credit card expenses.  If you put less than $1,000 a month on your credit card you are probably not going to accrue more than 12-13,000 points a year without bonuses.  Given that many point-based cards cost $80-$150 a year and that mileage to fly internationally usually starts at 35,000 miles and is typically closer to 60-80,000 miles round trip, you may actually cost yourself money by getting a mileage card. Ultimately, this is the type of user credit companies are hoping for.  You should also keep in mind that many airlines are in the process of inflating the number of miles needed for various destinations which is in turn driving up the amount of miles you need. Others have discussed switching to a different methodology for counting how many miles are needed from destination to destination.  In general, as you might imagine, very few of these changes actually benefit us as consumers.

On the other hand if you’re flying regularly for business, have business expenses, or your monthly credit card total is over $1,000 then a mileage card might be right for you. These cards often offer airfare bonuses for frequent fliers and if you can accrue points fairly quickly that annual fee becomes less of an issue.  Most cards waive the fee for the first year and offer a hefty mileage reward for signing up for the card.  While most offer 20-40,000 miles for signing up periodic specials are offered where that can be more than doubled.  I mentioned earlier that I was lured back to a miles credit card after having sworn off of them.  Despite reservations the special that drew me back in was a super bonus through British Airways which offered me 50,000 miles for opening the card and another 50,000 miles when I spent $3,500 on the card within the first three months (be very aware that many of these cards have similar requirements).  These miles were roughly the equivalent of two round trip tickets to Europe. So far I’ve had fairly good luck with the British Airways frequent flyer program, and I was able to book my ticket to Copenhagen using these miles without any of the redemption issues I had previously.

As you might imagine, there are a subset of consumers who are focusing on accruing the signup mileage bonuses as an alternative to accruing points on a per-dollar basis.  Keep in mind that even though you may get your points through an airline branded credit card, the points themselves are actually held within the Airline’s mileage program.  So, I can technically sign up for a Chase British Airways card with a 50,000 point sign up bonus, and a Bank of America British Airways Mastercard with a 45,000 point sign up bonus giving me a collective 95,000 British Airways miles.  Many of these users then cancel the card after keeping it for most of a year (thus avoiding the annual fee) while also meeting the $3000-$4,000 minimum spend required to qualify for the points.  So far credit card companies haven’t been thrilled about these users, but have tolerated them. Given that a fair number of people no doubt read up about this way of generating miles and register for cards intending to churn them, only to end up keeping the card I imagine the banks are still doing quite well.

The verdict is still out on just how negative the impact of this type of credit card churning can be on your credit. From what I’ve read it seems that those who tend to put a fair amount of cash onto their cards each month and maintain several old cards with a long credit history haven’t had significant issues.  On the other hand, I’ve also read reports from a number of users who have been blacklisted by various credit card providers.

This space is constantly changing, and varies from provider to provider so you’ll want to do extensive research before deciding what approach you take.  To do that research there are a number of communities that are dedicated to making mileage plans work for you. Keep in mind it’s a game and a complex one at that which is structured in the airline and bank’s favor.  Doing your research, having a plan and sticking to it is fundamental if you’re going to be able to successfully use your miles as a budget travel technique.  For research I suggest reviewing Chris Guillebeau’s posts on using frequent flyer miles via his Art of Non-Conformity Blog.  Additionally FlyerTalk is dedicated to all things frequent flyer based and is a great place to find out what cards are offering the best signup bonuses, how to get the most out of your mileage program, etc.

A few final thoughts – keep in mind that frequent flyer programs may give you the flight for free, but they often do not include taxes which you’re responsible for. For my one-way flight to Copenhagen I saved around $800 BUT still paid $250 in airport taxes and fees.  Also, if your work schedule is very limited it can be extremely difficult to redeem your miles on short (less than 6 months) notice.   On the other hand if you have a very flexible schedule, mileage can be great.  Another key consideration is the quality of the card itself.  Amazingly many mileage based “travel” cards are surprisingly not-very travel friendly.  While it is changing, many older mileage cards charged a 3% international transaction fee on all purchases made outside of the US, in addition to various other fees.  That adds up quick when abroad.   Lastly, consider the possibility of using your miles for a RTW (Round-The-World) style ticket.  These multi-destination tickets can be incredible, and often only slightly more expensive mileage wise than a long-distance international ticket. Though you’ll need to have more than a week or two to properly utilize them.

Hopefully that gives you a crash course introduction to mileage cards.  Make sure to head on over to FlyerTalk for more in-depth information and to do your own research.  To be clear, I’m not providing any financial advice in this article, or suggesting you employ any of the tactics outlined within this blog post.  Only that you utilize the resources available to educate yourself and make your own decisions.

Lindsay, thank you for a fantastic question!

If you end up using these tips to book a trip I’d love to hear about it! Good luck and safe travels!

If you’re looking for additional information, you can also explore what Nomadic Matt has to say. Matt is a premium advertising partner and also one of the most well recognized and respected names in the independent travel advice community.  He has a series of guides and informative posts that cover most of the relevant topics you need to worry about when preparing for a trip.  Of particular interest based on this post consider taking a look at his guide to the best travel rewards cards.  As a long-term traveler who has circumnavigated the globe he also provides a number of insights on how best to book and research round the world tickets.