A Black and White Photo Tour of Copenhagen in Spring

Spring in Denmark is amazing.  The seemingly endless  dark depths of winter are quickly replaced by brilliantly long days that seem to stretch on forever bathed in the amber hues of golden evenings and freshly invigorated mornings.  The parks blossom and bloom in an explosion of color while Copenhagen’s population revels in every ounce of warm spring sun.

While I’m constantly taking photos of Copenhagen and uploading them to flickr and Instagram I’ve realized I’m not posting those photos here on the blog nearly often enough. So, without further adieu,  are 45 black and white images of Copenhagen in Spring taken during Spring and early Summer of this year. You can view this post’s sibling, which contains 45 photos of Copenhagen in Spring, but in color HERE.

Have favorites?  Make sure to let me know! I love hearing how the photos capture your attention, inspire you, or ignite your memories!

Historic Nyhavn in Black and White

Nyhavn

Walking Copenhagen

Frederiksberg

2014 – A Year of Travel In 65 Black and White Photographs

As 2014 comes to a close it is time to look back over the year and to highlight some of my favorite photography. In 2014 I traveled less far-afield than during previous years but simultaneously spent more time familiarizing myself with the intimacies and breadth of texture present within Denmark. The image above is of the abandoned lighthouse at Rubjerg Knude in North Western Jutland. Upon the sand berm the individual posing is my younger brother. One of my goals this year was to work on my portrait photography and to add people into some of my shots. Hopefully you enjoy the result!

Highland Reflections – Weekly Travel Photo

Scottish Reflections

Located along Scotland’s A82 a few miles before the world famous Glen Coe are a series of small lakes.  These lakes rest in the open, surrounded by a few hearty trees that stand as silent sentinels braving the area’s brutal winters, unpredictable weather and near-constant winds.  These pools rest as beautiful oases in the midst of highland grasslands ringed by the imposing figure of the nearby glens.

As I made my way towards Glen Coe a few hours before sunset I found myself chasing small patches of blue sky glimpsed amidst movie-perfect cotton-ball clouds.  The road slowly wound between hills before spilling out into the near-treeless flat lands and as I crested a final hill, I found myself greeted by vivid reflections in the still waters of the highland lochs.  Enthralled by the sight, I quickly pulled my sky blue Volkswagen Beetle Coup to the side of the road and strolled across the squishy peat, careful to step around small clumps of blooming heather. I found a small path which led me to the water’s edge, where I snapped this shot of the cloud’s reflection visible in the still waters of Lochan na h-Achlaise. The mountains in the background are the little siblings of the mighty brutes which famously make up Glen Coe and have been featured in movies and songs for generations.

It was a magical moment, one that embodied the ethereal spirit of the Scottish Highlands – a place where nature’s raw and primitive beauty is pervasive.

Make sure to head over to flickr to see the rest of the album.

Would you like to see previous Weekly Photos? View past travel pictures here. This photo was taken on a Canon T3i (600D) Camera.

Rain Over The Scottish Highlands – Weekly Travel Photo

Scottish Highlands

Located in the heart of Scotland, this wonderful lake and overlook draws tourists in part because its shape mirrors a map of Scotland. Each time I visit Scotland I find my way back to it – Loch Garry.  During a trip this past August, however, I got a very special view.  The clouds were mixed and created a beautifully lit backdrop while a light, warm, summer rain fell.  As those who have spent time in Scotland are aware, these rains seldom last for more than a few minutes.  In this black and white photo, you can see the rain drops, which I think gives the whole image a pencil-drawingish feel.

Would you like to see previous Friday Photos? View past travel pictures here. This photo was taken on a  Canon T3i (600D) Camera.

Berlin’s Dramatic Contrast Explored Through Art

Berlin is famous for a plethora of reasons.  Of those one of the most well known is its character.  It is a wild city of contrasts both within the city limits and when explored alongside greater Germany as a whole.  In August I had the chance to re-visit one of Europe’s most famous cities.  Instead of detailing the experience in words I’ve decided to mix it up a bit and to explore it through art and color.   The photos in this post were taken at the various museums on Museum Island, at the Berlin Wall and Hackescher Markt Station.

TRADITION

 

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

HISTORY REBORN

 

Berlin Wall - Graffiti

Berlin Wall - Graffiti

Berlin - City Graffiti

Berlin - City Graffiti

Berlin Wall - Graffiti

Berlin - City Graffiti

Berlin - City Graffiti

Berlin Wall - Graffiti

Berlin Wall - Graffiti

Berlin Wall - Graffiti

ANCIENT HISTORY

 

Berlin - Beautiful Marbles

Berlin - Historic Artifacts

Berlin - Historic Artifacts

Berlin - Historic Artifacts

These are only a limited slice of all Berlin has to offer. What are your own personal favorite parts of Berlin?  Have anything I absolutely must visit next time I return to Berlin?

Zambian Village Life – Friday Travel Photo

Faces of Zambia

This photo was taken along the Zambia/DRC border in Luapula Provice, northern Zambia. Connecting with my brother who is a Peace Corps Volunteer in the region we stopped at another volunteer’s village for lunch. As we got acquainted, listened to her amazing stories and were introduced to her neighbors and the local village kids life casually went on around us. It was a beautiful opportunity to observe and experience a taste of Zambian village life. The Zambians were incredibly warm, hospitable, and incredibly respectful. The children were curious, shy, and always beaming brilliant smiles.

While there is no doubt that they lack many of the common niceties we enjoy – running water, electricity and all the creature comforts that go with it – they had a lust for life, and a richness that most of us are sorely missing.

Would you like to see previous Friday Photos? View past travel pictures here. This photo was taken on a Canon T3i (600D) Camera using a Canon IS 55-250mm lens.

The Tallest Building in the World – Friday’s Weekly Travel Photo

Black and White Burj Khalifa at Night

Located in the heart of a brutal, nearly inhospitable desert is a shining oasis of water, steel and light.  It’s a place full of wonders…tributes to all that man can accomplish, build and create.    Beyond the indoor ski slopes, ice rinks, and aquariums there’s one feat in particular that quite literally stands above the rest – the Burj Khalifa, more commonly just called the “Burj”. You probably know it simply as the tallest building in the world.  During a recent layover in the United Arab Emirates (Dubai) we made our way to the Burj, ascended to the 124th floor (which is only about 2/3 of the way up) and enjoyed a spectacular sunset.  After watching the fountain and light show below us from the observation deck we headed back down to ground level and spent some time staring skyward.  The Burj is lit at night. The result is a giant shining beacon that is 2,723 feet tall and holds a wealth of world records.  One of the most interesting of which is its 144th floor night club.

I snapped this black and white night shot to capture the moment.  I hope you enjoy it – for me it feels like something straight out of a 1920s or 1930s poster.  What thoughts come to mind for you?

Would you like to see previous Friday Photos? View past travel pictures here. This photo was taken on a Canon T3i (600D) dSLR Camera.

Martian Landscapes, Barren Desert and Old Bridges

Northern Arizona Desert - B&W

When I left you last I’d just wrapped up a delightful evening exploring Flagstaff and begun my first American Hostel experience.  The following morning I woke up early, washed up and made a quick call to connect with Noelle who was the friend of a friend I’d met the evening before and was eager to join me on my day-long road trip through Northern Arizona.  We connected around 10:30 and by 11 had piled into the car and were trailblazing northward.

Desert Cactus - Northern Arizona

The first 30 minutes of the drive were pleasant and cool along old route 89A.  It took us through rural Flagstaff, pine forest and open meadows before cresting a small hill which opened up onto Arizona’s barren flatland’s.   The view before us stretched out and away for miles with the straight black line of the road cutting a ruler-perfect line down the sloping hill and out toward the horizon.  From our vantage point it was easy to identify where the pine transitioned into juniper, the juniper forest into grass lands with an occasional tree and then the naked rocky terrain that springs to mind when one imagines Arizona.

Northern Arizona - View Towards Flagstaff

As we said goodbye to most things green we found a small paved road which forked out from a tiny town (Gray Mountain) with a restaurant, gas station and 4 buildings nestled along along the highway. Eager to get out into the countryside we followed the road as far as we could – it eventually turned to dirt before dead ending at a power relay station.  As we backtracked we parked (essentially in the middle of the road) and got out to take in the natural beauty and sheer contrast of the location.   The desert that surrounded us was brown and lacked any consistent form of ground vegetation, though it was periodically dotted by beautiful blooming cactus blossoms or small wildflowers with muted orange and yellow flowers.  The barren desert landscape stretched out, largely flat, but was broken by the snow covered peaks of the San Francisco Mountains which surround Flagstaff.

Cameron Trading Post - Arizona

Cameron

The small town of Cameron is located just under 60 miles north of Flagstaff and tends to stand out on maps for two main reasons.  The first and best known of which, is that it sits at the junction of Highway 89 and Highway 64, which splits off from 89 and strikes west towards the Grand Canyon.  The town’s second claim to fame is the Cameron Trading post: a sprawling trinket, food and hotel complex that sits overlooking the Little Colorado’s dusty riverbed.

Cameron Trading Post - Arizona

While the trading post itself has never had much draw for me – it mostly consists of the usual over-priced south western toy tomahawks, sand paintings and weird leather cowboy memorabilia – the old bridge built in 1911 has always captured my imagination.  There’s something about the basic design, when combined with the classic suspension architecture that oozes personality.

Cameron Trading Post - Arizona

The old one lane bridge, which has been closed to public traffic for years, turns 100 next year.  Though old and no longer used by automotive/foot traffic the bridge is in good condition and still supports a large north/south pipeline.  It offers an interesting contrast between new and old, as it stands immediately parallel to a more modern bridge which supports 89A and serves as one of Arizona’s main North/South arteries.

Northern Arizona Desert

Painted Desert/Tuba City

Some 30 miles North of Cameron is Tuba City.  Though a relatively short geographic distance, the geological variation is spectacular.  It shouldn’t come as a surprise that those 30 minutes, took us close to two hours as we regularly paused along the side of the road to explore.

Northern Arizona Desert

Our first stop was at a series of incredible bald hills.  The hills, if they can be called that, varied in size and looked more on par with giant anthills than the usual small hill.  Roughly the size of a house, they were completely devoid of any vegetation.  What limited vegetation could be found was usually in the form of small plants clustered along small ditches carved out by rain and erosion.

Northern Arizona Desert

Unfortunately, the area we stopped at had been used somewhat recently by ATVers for off road fun which left the hills heavily scarred. The ground itself had an odd consistency.  The dirt was cracked and obviously dry, but also extremely fine and soft.  It left me feeling like I was walking across the surface of the moon, though its appearance had far more in common with mars.  The dirt itself was a wide mixture of colors, from reds and browns to deep grays.  It’s truly an incredible site and well worth exploring.  Especially if you’re the type who has always dreamed of visiting Mars or the Moon.

Northern Arizona Desert

Our next stop wasn’t technically in the painted desert, which is further to the North East, but it did offer an incredible view of gorgeous desert landscapes that looked as though they’d been painted in watercolor.

Northern Arizona Desert

Located just outside Tuba City – these hills were absolutely stunning.  With each layer a different color they offer a desert rainbow for those who pause long enough to take them in.   In many places the sandstone rocks have been partially eroded creating small sand dunes, which only serve as a further reminder of just how arid and difficult the natural environment is.

Northern Arizona Desert

As we paused for a few photos, we were greeted by one of those a-typical sights that you only stumble across while traveling. As we stood sweating, roasting in the desert heat a heavily laden Asian man in what appeared to be his 30’s passed us.  In and of itself not all that noteworthy right?  Wrong, this guy was apparently rollerblading his way across the state, loaded with a heavy backpack, wearing two roller-blades, and with a modified hockey stick for balance (and perhaps snakes).  Needless to say, the guy oozed a mixture of badass and Buddhist monk.

From there it was up a hill, across jagged, rocky terrain and into Tuba City.  A small-ish town with a few gas stations, fast food joints and a dive restaurant or two.  We ended up at a small sandwich shop which looked busy and had mediocre food.   The service was slow and ambling, though that may have been as much perception as reality given our famished state.

Northern Arizona Desert

Time was slipping by, and we elected to stop our northward push and begin making our way back towards Cameron, where we’d split off and make a B-Line for the Grand Canyon in the hope of reaching it in time for sunset.  First, however, it was time for another quick break.  This time we found a small pull off atop a decent sized shelf, which offered a Lion King esque view of the desert valley below us.

Northern Arizona Desert

The view was incredible and the lack of vegetation served as a stark contrast against the pine trees and lush greenery that we’d started the morning out with.

Northern Arizona Desert

We took a few minutes to enjoy the view, paused to snap a few silly snapshots jumping off the cliff or taking in the scenery and then jumped back in the car.  We were drenched in sweat and eager to escape the sun scorched desert.

Where next? Cameron, a quick pause along the Little Colorado and then the Grand Canyon to take in a spectacular sunset. The photos from that leg of the trip are spectacular, so stay tuned for my next post!